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A Quick 2-Minute Primer on Why Amazon May Be Unstoppable.

Weaver Post — A small but delectable bite of insight and comedy on why Amazon is winning the war on retail.

Last week I wrote of the historical comparison between Amazon and the Battle of Dien Bien Phu, describing the incredible lengths to which Amazon, just like the Viet Minh, is willing to go in order to win the war on retail.

To illustrate my point, I did a personal experiment.  I ordered batteries from a local mass market retailer and from Amazon.   Reminder — Amazon packed and shipped the batteries significantly faster than I could checkout in the store.

Well, the batteries arrived the day after my blog post.  Upon opening the parcel, the Dien Bien Phu metaphor become even more palpable.   Take a look at my package:

Batteries-and-Book-2759325122-1498742349405.jpg

Look familiar?

Look like anything you have seen before?

It looks like a book . . .

Dual Photo

Does Amazon have any experience shipping books?

Translation:  under the covers, Amazon has become so powerful they now can get nearly century old battery companies to change their packaging to maximize their shipping efficiency.  Holy shit.

Try doing that bricks-and-mortar x,y,z retailer when you still need your batteries to have that little cardboard cutout thingy.  Not sure what I mean by “cardboard cutout thingy?”

Battery-Cutout.jpg

Three words:  Dien Bien Phu

Be careful out there,

Chris

P.S. If you are interested in reading or rereading the full Amazon and the Battle of Dien Bien Phu post, please click here.

P.P.S. Check out this exciting deal on Amazon being passed off as a legitimate news article by USA Today right this very second (side note:  USA Today does this every day).

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Chris Walton View All

Chris Walton is an accomplished Senior Executive with nearly 20 years of success within the retail and retail technology industries. He is well-versed in merchandising, store operations, inventory management, product design, forecasting, e-commerce, pricing and promotions, and tech product development.

Chris was most recently a Vice President with Target, where he led the retailer’s Store of the Future project and also ran the Target’s home furnishing division for e-commerce. He previously worked for GAP, Inc., as a Distribution Analyst and Manager.

Chris holds a BA in Economics and History from Stanford University, and a MBA from Harvard Business School.

He likes to dress as Darth Vader for Halloween, and his wife also frequently asks him to ask Alexa, "to turn off the music."

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